Hoping for the best. Prepared for the worst. Praying, no matter what happens.

Hoping for the best.  Prepared for the worst.  Praying, no matter what happens.

All we can do, now, is wait.

Hurricane Irma – a historically strong, potentially-catastrophe-causing storm – is heading this way.  All forecasts indicate that Southeast Florida, where I live, is very likely the target.  Maybe not.  Likely so.

For now, all we can do is wait

We’ve purchased hurricane supplies.  With the help of friends, the hurricane shutters have been hung.  We’ve gassed up.  We’re taking this storm seriously and, short of evacuating, we’ve done all we can do to prepare.

Now, all we can do is wait.  All we can do is hope for the best, but be ready for the worst.

Surprisingly, as a 50-year-old Floridian, I’ve never experienced a major storm.  We were in graduate school, in North Carolina, during Hurricane Andrew.  We’ve been on the far-outskirts of a few hurricanes and tropical storms – but, nothing significant.  Last year, we fully-prepared for Hurricane Matthew – but, barely saw a cloud in the sky.  If Irma visits Southeast Florida, this will be my first.

Honestly, I won’t mind if Irma decides to just had out to sea!  I don’t think this is a life-experience I need to have!  I will be sincerely happy if all of the storm preparation was unnecessary!

Waiting for a storm of this magnitude is a vulnerable feeling.  Fortunately, we live in a safe home, and could afford the needed supplies.  But, are we prepared enough?  Is this house strong enough?  Will Irma’s impact exceed our preparations?  Are we prepared for the potential aftermath and clean-up? I don’t know.  I just don’t know.

I am aware that many are far more vulnerable than we are.  My heart goes out to them.

Not knowing, for sure, what’s to come, all we can do is wait.

No.  That’s not true.  Prayer is also an option.

While I don’t really believe that prayer will push Irma out to sea (If I did, how would I explain Harvey’s impact on Texas and Louisiana?  Lack of prayers?  There are probably more Christians in Houston than just about anywhere!  How would I explain the devastation Irma has already caused in the Islands?), I do believe that God is bigger than the biggest storm, and that God is present, with us, in the storm.

Throughout the Psalms, God is called “a rock, a fortress, a hiding place, a strong shelter.” Honestly, in this context, I’m not sure what those metaphors mean.  But, that’s what I am praying over my family, my church, my friends, and my community.  “God, please be our rock, our fortress, our hiding place, our strong shelter.”  Whatever comes, may we experience the peace of God’s presence, his strength and courage to endure the storm, and the faith and hope in his power to redeem and restore whatever is broken.

And, in the days to come, I am praying for the Church to be the Church.  It’s times like this that reveal the very best of humanity.  In the face of catastrophes, the best of the human spirit shines forth.  If we somehow, someway avoid this monster storm, thank God!  Someone, somewhere will still need the compassionate generosity and kindness of Christian people.  If we don’t avoid this, and find ourselves climbing out of the rubble in a few days, may we be people of hope, love, and generosity, as we recover and rebuild our lives and community together.  Let’s be the Church, and demonstrate to the world the very best of being the hands and feet of Christ!

For now, we wait.  We hope for the best, and prepare for the worst.  And, we pray to the God, who is our shelter in the storm.

My prayers are with you.  Be safe.

Ancient-Future

Ancient-Future

I recently listened to a program on NPR called, In Salt Lake City You’ll Find Mormons Who Meditate.  You can read the transcript at In Salt Lake City You’ll Find Mormons Who Meditate

In summary, the story is about a man who grew up Mormon, left the Mormon faith as a young adult, learned about Buddhist Mindfulness (meditation), while visiting Salt Lake City felt a calling to return to Mormonism, and now leads Mindfulness experiences for fellow-Mormons.  This seems to be particularly attractive to young adult and dis-affected Mormons.

I’m not Mormon, and I don’t practice Buddhist Mindfulness.  But, I am part of a Christian denomination (United Methodist) that seems to be less and less attractive/relevant to more and more people.  I am also very familiar with ancient Christian forms of contemplation and meditation, particularly from the mystical side of the monastic traditions, that have some parallels to Buddhist practices.

As I listened to this radio broadcast, I couldn’t help but wonder if the Mormons have discovered something that might also be appealing and appropriate in my context and tradition.

I wonder if mainline Christianity has become too focused on programming, structure, institutional bureaucracy, rules, and doctrine?  I wonder if we’ve neglected something that people are hungry for – ancient practices that help people connect with God in deeper, richer, more personal, and more experiential ways?

Christianity has a rich tradition of…

  • Prayer
  • Journaling
  • Silence
  • Solitude
  • Meditation
  • Contemplation
  • Listening
  • Mysticism
  • Spiritual Direction
  • Spiritual Disciplines

But, if I am honest, most of that tradition has been lacking in the churches and ministries I’ve led, beyond occurring in limited way in small groups or by individual practitioners.

I can’t help but wonder what we’ve lost by ignoring these spiritual treasures.  And, I can’t help but wonder if our Mormon friends might have discovered something really important.  I can’t help but wonder if a future for main-line Christianity is a return to ancient spiritual practices.

I wonder.

Smooth

Smooth

I had to have an EEG (electroencephalogram) this week.  The purpose of an EEG is to test electrical activity in the brain, and to assess for abnormalities.  I suspect that no one, who knows me,  is surprised that I needed a test to check for brain abnormalities!

When the dozens of the wires from my scalp to the computer were connected, the technician said, “Wow!  Your brain waves are really smooth.”  I asked her to repeat herself.  “Your brain waves are really smooth.”  

Not knowing what a brain wave is supposed to look like, I asked, “Is that unusual?”  Oh yeah.” she said, “Most people’s are really chaotic!”

Let me be clear – the tech did NOT say whether “smooth” brain waves are a good or a bad thing.  She did not say that whether “smooth” or “chaotic” is a better sign of brain health.  Frankly, at that moment, I was just glad to hear that my brain was producing any waves at all!  I’m not always sure!

Let’s assume for a moment that having “smooth” brain waves is a good thing (I’m hoping that is the case).  I’m imagining the smooth stillness of a pool undisturbed water.  I’m imagining peace and tranquility.  I like peace and tranquility.

Then imagine some punk kid throwing rocks into your pool, or maybe jumping in like a cannon ball, wrecking your “smoothness” with a big splash, crashing waves and endless ripples.  Imagine rock after rock, cannon ball after cannon ball, endlessly disrupting your “smoothness.”

I feel like this happens a lot.  Did I mention that I really like peace and tranquility?

Interruptions.  Distractions.  Pressures.  Surprises.  Annoyances.  Noises.  Fears.  Complaints.  Emergencies.  Bad news.

Chaos.

For the moment, I am assuming that “smooth” brain waves is a good thing – at least, that is what I am hoping!  If so, then I wonder if that is why things like rest, Sabbath, prayer, contemplation and meditation, stillness, and silence are such good things.  The world around us creates chaos, that we inevitably internalize.  Sometimes we create our own mental chaos, from busy-ness or worry.  When our inner life reflects the chaos of our outer lives, I suspect we need to be intentional about seeking “smoothness.”

I could be wrong, of course.  My “smooth brain waves,” might be the evidence of what we have all suspected – a lack of sufficient mental activity.  But, regardless of what the doctor says, I suspect I am right about the need to regularly “smooth-out” our souls and psyches by inviting the Spirit to still us, silence us, and “smooth” us.

As the old hymn says,

Be still, my soul: thy God doth undertake
To guide the future, as He has the past.
Thy hope, thy confidence let nothing shake;
All now mysterious shall be bright at last.
Be still, my soul: the waves and winds still know
His voice Who ruled them while He dwelt below.

So, how smooth are your waves?